Cisco IOS dial peer basics

To find all dial-peers configured use “show run | include dial-peer”
To see the configuration of all the dial-peers use “show run | section dial-peer”
If you want to see the entire configuration use “show run”, but I’d start to get comfortable with using the | syntax to help reduce paging through lengthy configurations. Before you make any changes it is a good idea to save a copy of the configuration as a reference. This can be done in a few ways, but the easiest is usually to log your terminal session (turn on logging in PuTTY) and then type “show run” and page through the entire configuration to ensure that it’s been logged. By doing this you can easily revert back to a previous configuration without scrambling to find a backup copy somewhere on the network.When you’ve found a dial-peer that is a good template for what you want to do simply copy and paste that single dial-peer to notepad. A single dial-peer will start with the “dial-peer voice xxx” and ends with the last indented line. When Cisco IOS parses the configuration the indents are automatically added to help make it easier to see what sub-commands are related to a parent command. In the examples below the “dial-peer voice xxx” commands are parent commands and everything indented below them are commands related to these parent commands. You’ll see that same syntax many places within the configuration for things other than dial-peers as well.Note: Make sure when you configure a new dial-peer that you choose a unique number to identify the dial-peer otherwise you’ll be overwriting the existing dial-peer with your new configuration. In the example below you’d be safe creating a dial-peer “102”. The router will not prompt you or prevent you from overwriting existing configuration it will simply assume that you want to change what it already there. You can think of when you press the “insert” key in Word and whenever you type with the cursor in front of existing text you simply overwrite what’s there. You should also know that any configuration changes take effect immediately.Example:

Router#show run | include dial-peer
dial-peer voice 6000 voip
dial-peer voice 100 voip
dial-peer voice 101 voipRouter#show run | section dial-peerdial-peer voice 6000 voip
destination-pattern 60[01].
session protocol sipv2
session target ipv4:192.168.1.100
voice-class codec 2
dtmf-relay rtp-nte
no vad
dial-peer voice 100 voip
translation-profile outgoing OUTBOUND
destination-pattern 9[2-9]..[2-9]......
progress_ind setup enable 3
session protocol sipv2
session target ipv4:192.168.1.100
voice-class sip early-offer forced
dtmf-relay rtp-nte
codec g711ulaw
no vad
dial-peer voice 101 voip
translation-profile outgoing OUTBOUND
destination-pattern 91[2-9]..[2-9]......
progress_ind setup enable 3
session protocol sipv2
session target ipv4:192.168.1.100
voice-class sip early-offer forced
dtmf-relay rtp-nte
codec g711ulaw
no bad

To add a new dial-peer you first need to ensure that you’re in configuration mode (take a look at the router prompt and if you see the word “config” after the router hostname you’re good to go). If you’re in enable mode (you’ll see the hash or octothorpe after the router hostname) type “config t” to enter config mode.

Example:

Router#Now we enter configuration mode:Router#config tThe prompt changes to:Router(config)#From the configuration prompt you can type or paste your new dial-peer.

Router(config)#dial-peer voice 102 voip
translation-profile outgoing OUTBOUND
destination-pattern 9011T
progress_ind setup enable 3
session protocol sipv2
session target ipv4:192.168.1.100
voice-class sip early-offer forced
dtmf-relay rtp-nte
codec g711ulaw
no vad

To return to enable mode type "exit"

Router(config)#exit

The prompt will return to the enable mode prompt:

Router#

To save your configuration type "write memory". If you don't do this and someone restarts the router or power is lost your configuration changes will be lost.

Router#write memory

You'll see two messages displayed and then you'll be returned to the enable mode prompt:

Router#wr mem
Building configuration...

[OK]
Router#

To logout of the router and close your session type "exit":

Router#exit

Strange crypto map commands logged at boot up

When configuration archiving and logging is configured on an IOS router with a crypto capable image you may some rather odd commands every time the router starts up.

Here’s an example of what’s shown when you run the “show archive log config all”

1 1 console@console |access-list 199 permit icmp host 10.10.10.10 host 20.20.20.20
2 1 console@console |crypto map NiStTeSt1 10 ipsec-manual
3 1 console@console |match address 199
4 1 console@console |set peer 20.20.20.20
5 1 console@console |exit
6 1 console@console |no access-list 199
7 1 console@console |no crypto map NiStTeSt1

At first glance this appears to something nefarious, but it’s actually a test routine built in to IOS in order to meet FIPS requirements. It’s completely normal and does not impact normal operations.

Viewing pre-shared keys in Cisco ASA configuration

Most of the configuration on an ASA can be viewed in plain text just by using the “show run” command. One of the exceptions to this is viewing pre-shared keys for VPN’s (the keys appear as asterisks ‘*’). These keys can however be viewed using the command “more system:running-config” which displays the running configuration including the pre-shared keys in plain text. If you want to filter the output to just the lines containing the keys use “more system:running-config | include keys”.

Hide Cisco Unity Voice Messages from Microsoft Outlook Inbox

All Unity voice messages have a message class of “IPM.Note.Voice.Unity” (Unity Connection uses the message class IPM.Note.Custom.Cisco.Unity.Voice). Within Outlook you can adjust the default view to prevent displaying messages of specific classes thus hiding the Unity generated messages without moving them to a folder. This technique should allow for the MWI light status to be accurate and messages will be able to be retrieved via the phone.

Instructions:

  1. Launch Outlook
  2. Select View-> Current View-> Customize Current View
  3. Click the “Filter…” button
  4. Click the “Advanced” tab
  5. Click “Field” under “Define more criteria:”
  6. Select All Mail Fields->Message Class
  7. Select the “doesn’t contain” option under “Condition”
  8. In the “Value:” field enter IPM.Note.Voice.Unity
  9. Click “Add to List”
  10. Click “Ok” twice to save and activate your changes

The change should be active immediately and voice messages will no longer appear in the inbox or anywhere that this view is active. Different views can be created for different folders in case voice messages should appear in a sub-folder.

This was tested with Outlook 2007 on Windows 7.

Konica Minolta bizhub SNMP Counters

Konica Minolta doesn’t appear to publish SNMP documentation for the bizhub product line. After doing quite a bit of research I found the following OID’s that work for gathering total counters, copy counters, scan counters, and color toner levels. I tested this with both a bizhub C552DS and a bizhub 751.

Total Counters:

1.3.6.1.4.1.18334.1.1.1.5.7.2.1.1.0 – Total
1.3.6.1.4.1.18334.1.1.1.5.7.2.1.3.0 – Total Duplex
1.3.6.1.4.1.18334.1.1.1.5.7.2.1.8.0 – Number of Originals
1.3.6.1.4.1.18334.1.1.1.5.7.2.1.9.0 – Number of Prints

Copy Counters:

1.3.6.1.4.1.18334.1.1.1.5.7.2.1.5.2.1 – Color
1.3.6.1.4.1.18334.1.1.1.5.7.2.1.5.1.1 – Black

Print Counters:

1.3.6.1.4.1.18334.1.1.1.5.7.2.1.5.2.2 – Color
1.3.6.1.4.1.18334.1.1.1.5.7.2.1.5.1.2 – Black

Total Scans:

1.3.6.1.4.1.18334.1.1.1.5.7.2.1.5.0 – Total

Color Toner:

1.3.6.1.2.1.43.11.1.1.9.1.4 – Black (percentage remaining)